Goodreads Facebook Pinterest
Bestselling Author, Michelle Moran Bestselling Author, Michelle Moran
bookclubs following Michelle Moran bookclubs following Michelle Moran Information about Michelle Moran for writers Information about Michelle Moran for bloggers Information about Michelle Moran for the press Fun stuff from Michelle Moran Contanct Michelle Moran Michelle Moran's gallery of travel photo's Michelle Moran's videos
Goodreads Facebook Pinterest
 

 



Michelle's Books
| International Edition | Upcoming Releases | Booksellers

Cleopatra's Daughter cover

Reviews
Read an Excerpt
The Heretic Queen Q&A

Order The Heretic Queen from your local independent bookseller through IndieBound.

You can also order The Heretic Queen from:


 

Akhenaten

Akhenaten

Akhenaten
Amenhotep IV, called Amunhotep the Younger in my novel, radically broke with some of the most important traditions of his time. He created a new religion, tossing aside the gods of Egypt who had worshiped for thousands of years. In place of Amun, he instituted the religion of the Aten. Aten was sun-disk, and by creating a new religion Amunhotep IV destroyed the wealthy Amun Priests, which may have been one of his goals. Amunhotep then went so far as to change his name to Akhenaten, which means "He who acts beneficently for Aten."

Akhenaten

Akhenaten
Some researchers give Akhenaten credit for creating the first known monotheistic faith, but there is evidence to the contrary, since in the city of Amarna there were found statues to the goddess Tawaret as well as many other gods. Akhenaten's main purpose in creating a new religion seems to have been out of self-interest rather than any monotheistic notion. He made a concerted effort to destroy the Amun Priests and their temples, but little to no effort to eradicate any other god. It is no wonder that after he died, the reinstated Amun Priests attempted to erase all record of his reign.

Akhenaten

Akhenaten With a Smaller Nefertiti
Before Nefertiti grew as powerful as her husband in the court of Amarna, she was depicted on walls as smaller than him. In this scene from Amarna the royal couple are offering prayers to the sun-god Aten. The sun's rays end with hands holding the ankh of life. Only once does Mutnodjmet appear in any of these scenes, and she is not depicted as participating in the offerings. She is seen standing back, her hands at her sides, looking on.

Akhenaten


Amarna Statue
Determining to be unlike any other Pharaoh, Akhenaten moved the capital from Thebes to a new city he would build called Akhet-aten (in the novel its known by its present day name of Amarna). Once the royal couple had their own city, Akhenaten and Nefertiti engraved their images on hundreds of walls, arches and structures. Archaeologists have come across over a thousand depictions of the royal couple making offerings to Aten, playing with their children, or riding chariots through the streets of Amarna.

Akhenaten

Male-Female Akhenaten
Akhenaten's androgynous statues were a concerted effort to create his own style of art different from that of any other Pharaoh, and an attempt to portray himself as both the male and female divine. By depicting himself as both, he could replace Isis and Amun, Hathor and Tawaret, and become the all seeing all knowing, female/male god.

Akhenaten

Akhenaten Kissing His Child
Akhenaten commissioned domestic scenes of himself and his wife Nefertiti with their children. He clearly wanted the people of Egypt to remember him as he was— his daily events, the foods he loved, the beautiful wife and children who populated his glittering palace. Here, Akhenaten sits on the left, kissing one of his daughters. Nefertiti, on the right, holds one daughter on her knee while another rests on her shoulder and plays with the strips of linen coming from her crown.

   
Read Michelle Moran's Blog, History Buff.